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Homo Habilis Specimen Still Not Found

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Since the discovery of Otzi, in the Alps, on the border between Italy and Austria, and with the continual recession of glaciers across the world there has been the hope of new archeological discoveries. A …

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Home » Headline, Weird news

Yeti Crab Mystery Solved

Submitted by on December 5, 2011 – 8:40 AM3 Comments | 626 views

 

The “Yeti” crab. A crustacean who gets its nickname from its long and shaggy arms which are said to resemble those of the infamous abominable beast. For awhile now, marine biologists have been puzzled as to why the “Yeti” crab would sway its arms in a slow and rhythmic manner from side to side. It turns out the crabs constantly perform this shuffle, not because of a mating ritual, but because they actually “farm” bacteria on their arms to use as nourishment.

Goes to show you why crustaceans have survived for so, so long. Go evolution!

Full article: NatGeo

The “yeti” crab farms bacteria on its furry arms as its main source of food, scientists say.

The crabs—a family of crustaceans with long, shaggy arms that resemble the mythical yeti, or abominable snowman—were discovered only in 2005.

The first known species of these blind white crabs, Kiwa hirsuta, were found near boiling-hot hydrothermal vents roughly 7,500 feet (2,300 meters) deep. The vents are located on the floor of the South Pacific some 900 miles (1,500 kilometers) south of Easter Island (map). (See picture: “‘Yeti Crab’ Discovered in Deep Pacific.”)

In 2006 scientists uncovered another species of yeti crab, K. puravida, living in cold, methane-seeping fissures about 3,300 feet (1,000 meters) deep near Costa Rica.

K. puravida regularly waved its claws slowly and rhythmically, puzzling scientists.

“When I first saw it, ‘baffled’ would be a good word for how I felt,” said study co-author Andrew Thurber, a biological oceanographer at Oregon State University in Corvallis.

One early explanation for the behavior was that the crabs were trying to keep others at a distance.

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I'm a writer, a runner, and a hell of a coffee drinker residing in Los Angeles. I'm currently working on a book about Doris Bither and her terrifying account of a haunting in Culver City, California. The case was dubbed "The Entity" and it stands to be one of the most controversial cases ever to be studied by parapsychologists.

  • elhombre

    Must be a slow month for news Javier?

    There’s a joke in the term Yeti crabs for sure, but I’m not going to go there.

  • http://ghosttheory.com Javier Ortega

    No, not a slow day. I’m just extremely busy with work. We’re launching some new “cloud” technology and I’ve been working on the network engineering aspect of it. It leaves me little to no time for GT. but that’s what amphetamines are for, right? *starts to twitch*

  • Mat

    Go evolution? Like “go Darwin?” Goin secular on me , dude?