Babinda Boulders’ ghost? Where?

Can someone help me out here and tell me where this “ghost face” is supposed to be? These type of images are annoyingly abundant all over the web. The type where the person who took the picture will find a random pattern and recognize it as a face (pareidolia). Full source: Cairns.com.au A MELBOURNE tourist


Melbourne visitor Emily Carydias claims this photo shows a 'ghost face' at the Babinda Boulders

Melbourne visitor Emily Carydias claims this photo shows a 'ghost face' at the Babinda Boulders


Can someone help me out here and tell me where this “ghost face” is supposed to be?

These type of images are annoyingly abundant all over the web. The type where the person who took the picture will find a random pattern and recognize it as a face (pareidolia).

Full source: Cairns.com.au

A MELBOURNE tourist believes she has caught photographic evidence of a ghost haunting Babinda Boulders.
Emily Carydias was on a tour that included Babinda Boulders on Thursday and was aware of the legend of the Aboriginal woman who is said to haunt the water.

Knowing that, she deliberately took a photograph of the water with her simple “point-and-shoot” camera and was stunned when she looked through the shots that night.

“I was just flicking through them last night and I couldn’t believe it … I thought I was going crazy … she looks pretty grumpy,” Ms Carydias told The Weekend Post yesterday.

The last person to drown at the spot was Tasmanian naval seaman James Bennett, the 17th person to die at the tourist attraction south of Cairns since 1959.

The legend of Babinda Boulders surrounds a beautiful young girl named Oolana, who was chosen to marry a respected tribal elder named Waroonoo.

After they married, a wandering tribe entered their valley, including Dyga, a young, handsome man.
Legend has it that he and Oolana fell in love at first sight and, ultimately, ran away together.

The two tribes searched for the pair and it was at the Babinda Boulders that they were spotted.
Dyga was seized and forced away, while members of Oolana’s tribe had hold of her before she broke away and threw herself into the water.

Some people say Oolana’s spirit lures young male swimmers to their death.
Of the 17 drownings at the site since 1959, 16 have been male.

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