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Alien Drawings Found In Trash

October 22, 2014 – 10:18 AM | One Comment | 1,157 views

People throw away the darndest things. That fact does not make any of that trash evidence of anything.
From Neo Nettle.com
Mysterious Box Found In Trash Contained Drawings Of Extraterrestrials
By: Sasha Sutton  |@SashaEricaS
October 21st 2014
They say one …

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Home » Aliens, Headline, Mystery of History, Paranormal, UFOs

Did The London Times Publish A UFO Abduction Case In 1873?

Submitted by on May 10, 2014 – 2:11 PM2 Comments | 4,823 views

greys

In the subject of Ufology an Abductee is someone who experiences (subjectively) real memories of having been yanked out of their beds or sleeping bags by little green grey men. The abductees are completely convinced of having experienced a traumatic abduction by alien entities.

When studied under hypnosis, most abductees or Experiencers will describe terrifying scenes of invasive examination by these unearthly creatures. The patients have reported unfamiliar buzzing noises, weightlessness, cackling voices, and strange lights moments before an abduction. They’ve also reported sometimes seeing the Greys standing around their beds, while in complete paralysis. An image that sends shivers down my spine.

Of course, this is all subjective. However in December of 1873 The London Times published a strange article about a couple who described similar events like those of who have been taken.

Extraordinary Hallucination

A singular circumstance came to light in the Bristol Police Court, on Tuesday. Mr. Thomas B. Cumpston, and his wife, Mrs. Ann Martha Cumpston, of Virginia Road, Leeds, were brought up for being disorderly at the Victoria Hotel and with letting off fire-arms. It was stated in evidence by the landlady of the hotel, Mrs. Tongue, that the defendants took an apartment at the hotel, on Monday evening, and retired to rest about twelve o’clock. About four o’clock in the morning she was awoke by loud screams and shouts in their bed room, succeeded by a report of fire-arms. She went down and found that they had both leapt from their bed room into the yard below—a depth of upwards of twelve feet—and then made their way to the railway station opposite.

Mr. T. Harker, the night superintendent on the Bristol and Exeter Railway, said the parties rushed into his office, partly dressed, crying out “Murder,” and they were in a terrible state of excitement. They told him they had escaped from a den of rogues and thieves, and they had to defend themselves. They were under the impression that someone was following them, and they made him search the waiting room to see there was no one there. Upon his sending for a policeman, Mr. Cumpston was searched, and a revolver and three knives were found upon him.

When asked by the magistrate what he had to say in explanation of the matter, Mr. Cumpston, who had an impediment in his speech, said he and his wife had been staying at Clifton; but, intending to proceed to Weston-super-Mare that morning, they came down and engaged a room at the Victoria Hotel, being near the railway station. They were alarmed at about four o’clock in the morning by terrible noises which they could not explain, and which frightened them very much. The bed seemed to open, and did all sorts of strange things. The floor, too, opened, and they heard voices. They were so terrified that they opened their bed-room window and leapt out.

Mrs. Cumpston, also, gave her version of the affair. She said they heard terrible noises at about four o’clock in the morning. The floor seemed to be giving way. It certainly opened, and her husband fell down some distance, and she tried to get him up. What they said was repeated every time they spoke. Being very much frightened she asked her husband to fire off his pistol, which he did, into the ceiling. The noises continuing, they got out of the window, but she did not know how. When they got outside she asked her husband to fire off his pistol again. They then ran up to the railway station. In reply to the Bench, the lady said she did not hear the noises so plainly as her husband. Ultimately, a Mr. Butt, who had been telegraphed for from Gloucester, attended the Court, and in reply to the Bench said the parties occupied a very good position in Leeds. He offered to take proper charge of them if they were handed over to him, which was ultimately done, the defendants being discharged from custody. No explanation can be given of this strange affair, and the belief is that it was an hallucination on the part of the husband. — Source: The Spiritual Magazine

 

The Cumpstons experience at the Victoria Hotel sounds like a typical night at the Overlook Hotel. However, something that night scared the couple so much that Mr. Cumpston  was forced to shoot at the rogues and thieves that they said were out to get them.

Either the London Times of 1873 published an article on two stoners tripping on shrooms, or something otherworldly happened that night at the Victoria Hotel.

 

 

 

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I'm a writer, a runner, and a hell of a coffee drinker residing in Los Angeles. I'm currently working on a book about Doris Bither and her terrifying account of a haunting in Culver City, California. The case was dubbed "The Entity" and it stands to be one of the most controversial cases ever to be studied by parapsychologists.

  • mustangmorris

    Completely anecdotal

  • RotorRob

    Night terrors, sleep paralysis. Brain likes to keep us from being bored.